THIS SITE IS UNDER THE AUTHORITY OF:  The Arizona Board of Homeopathic and Integrated Medicine Examiners and The Pastoral Medical Association.

© 2019 Tennant Institute 

Thyroid Management

The Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) test came into use in 1972.  In your body, the actual Thyroid Stimulating Hormone is synthesized and secreted by your pituitary gland; it is a “pituitary” hormone, not a “thyroid” hormone. 

 

The TSH is like a messenger sent to tell the thyroid to release T4, which then has to be converted to T3 at the cellular level, using many nutrients in which people are deficient.  Using the TSH to diagnose thyroid disorders is not reliable.  You can have a normal TSH and still be hypothyroid on the cellular level with a low Free-T3.


Is the TSH Test Reliable?


In Western Medicine, prescription dosages are based solely on a TSH level.  A patient may have a target TSH level, but still be under-treated because that is only part of the story.  

 

We must also consider T3 and T4; but it goes further.  

 

Simply testing for TOTAL T3/T4 does not quantify what hormones are free and usable within the body.  New tests, such as Free-T3, Reverse-T3 and Free-T4, paint a more complete picture and these are the tests the Tennant Institute orders for you.  We will measure to know what is going on at the cellular level of your thyroid function.


Bottom line

 

Simply measuring your TSH cannot be the extent of testing, as this only detects about 20% of thyroid disorders. 

Ineffective treatments

Ineffective treatment of thyroid dysfunction is correlated with high cholesterol levels.  When a patient has high cholesterol, dangerous statins are often prescribed when T3 supplementation can lower cholesterol more safely.


Patients with thyroid dysfunction complain of difficulty with mood management and lethargy; anti-depressants are often unnecessarily prescribed when T3 medication would have been safer and more effective.